Mens Vintage Jeans

The 1960s saw fashion reject the conventions and niceties of previous eras. Clothing broke with social traditions that dictated what could be worn when and by whom. In the past, attire had been divided in to ‘formal’ and ‘casual’ wear, and distinct separations were made between the styles of clothing worn by men and women. The 1960s, however, saw the emergence of unisex clothing such as denim jeans, which could be worn by both sexes. Denim jeans, which had remained a staple wardrobe item for many young people throughout the decade, were inspired by mod fashion. New styles of denim jeans emerged and the rest is history.

One of the top denim trends is always going to be jeans. From flared to bootcut to skinny and wide leg, jeans are coming in and out of fashion trends all of the time. Jeans are settling for a more classic fit. Almost anything goes. Skinny, straight, pooled around the ankle, even cropped. The main thing to remember with jeans, or any clothing to pull off the classic trend in men’s fashion, is that they fit you. That’s true for most things you wear to make it look classic. Jeans will remain a classic though and, if done right, very contemporary.

Discover Relco London’s range of high quality vintage men’s jeans. Designed to help you achieve that classic 60s look, Relco London have been at the forefront of Vintage UK fashion since 1964.

camplin – made in italy

The Camplin success story really came from the British Colonies, where Charles understood the need for standardization in uniform production. From that moment on he was the one to supply uniforms to the Royal Navy in their most important Colonial Campaign. This was also the reason why he was awarded the Naval General Service medal (a medal with a blue ribbon with green stripes) and to this day the same blue and green tape is used in finishing touches to the Peacoat.

This is a short length of cord used as an extension for buttoning up the double breasted jacket. The cordage was used in colder climates when the added layers of clothing under the uniform meant that the jacket couldn’t be buttoned up by using the buttonhole. Each seaman had his own cordage made to measure for his sea voyages.

Mr Camplin was well-known for supplying uniforms to the Royal Navy. It was in fact his idea to suggest the use of the Peacoat as part of the Petty Officer’s uniform. Up until then Petty Officers had the same uniform as ordinary able seamen. However they needed their own uniform to make the distinction but something that would be more practical than the Great Coat which senior Officers had. Mr Camplin than came up with the idea of a jacket, having the same important style as a coat but the practical ease in movement of a jacket. So the P. Officers got their P.Coat (P for Petty in Petty Officer) which then for phonetic reasons became the word Peacoat. This is the story behind why Mr Camplin is rightly believed by many to be the inventor of the Peacoat.

The use of an edging as a border for our buttonholes and pocket edges made of a blue grosgrain with green stripes which reminds usof the ribbon used for the General Naval Service medal givento civilians who distinguished themselves in the service ofthe Royal Navy.

solovair shoes 1881 made in uk

solovair shoes 1881 made in uk, The county of Northamptonshire, England, has long been renowned for its boots and shoe making; the village of Wollaston just outside of Wellingborough is no exception. Until the latter part of the 19th century, shoes and boots were normally made in homes by individual shoemakers, who were paid only for the work they had ready when the collector came with his barrow to the door. Remuneration was poor and there was little security of employment.

 

In an attempt to impose some regularity of income, in 1881 five men living in Wollaston banded together to form a co-operative (a company owned and run by the people working in it), called the Northamptonshire Productive Society (NPS). Their premises were based in a dove house located in Thrift Street, Wollaston, and NPS was locally referred to as ‘the Duffers’. Luck was with them from the outset as they managed to secure an order for army boots from the Government, an order which would sustain them for the first year.

 

As industrialisation spread in England during the late nineteenth Century, demand in England and abroad for high-quality boots steadily increased. Accordingly, NPS enjoyed rapid growth and by the turn of the previous century NPS had grown to 80 employees. Consequently, NPS moved to a larger purpose-built factory on South Street, which although modified and expanded, they occupy to this day.

 

Footwear has been made at NPS with various different construction methods, including riveted and stitched, stuck-on, vulcanised and more recently Goodyear welted which is now used in all our shoe production. In the 1950’s Austrian Dr. Maerten (subsequently anglicised to Dr. Marten) and his associate Mr Funck developed a now famous air cushion sole. R. Griggs Group Ltd., who owned the rights to manufacture footwear with this technology, sought out the best local factories to manufacture footwear using this sole. NPS was an obvious choice and in 1959 the first English pair of sample boots with air-cushioned soles was welted in the NPS factory. For 35 years NPS produced Solovair (Sole-of-Air) boots and shoes under license, which were sold under the name “Dr Martens by Solovair”.

 

Times change and NPS no longer produces boots and shoes under license, but we have maintained our independence and high-quality standards. NPS patented the name Solovair in 1995 and our latest range of footwear not only maintains our original manufacturing quality, but our products have been enhanced with a new ‘Soft Suspension’ sole that improves the comfort and durability.

 

The famous production standards of NPS has secured Solovair a reputation with retailers and discerning customers, as a premium soft suspension product. Rather than have a continuous production line, which we believe offers the operative no time to notice and correct any errors, NPS is organised in areas according to distinct stages of production. Each pair is only passed from one area to another when the respective operative is satisfied they are ready. In this respect, there is a far slimmer chance that an unsatisfactory shoe or boot will result at the end of the production process. In effect it is a continuous quality control process not employed by many other factories.

 

NPS continue to remain true to their ideals, combining over 130 years of tradition, the latest technology and materials, in order to produce the best quality shoes and boots. To maintain this undisputed quality, our products will always be hand-made from start (‘clicking’) to ‘finishing’ in the UK.