Pike Brothers – jeans & Garment

Pike Brothers – jeans & Garment

Pike Brothers has a strong passion for the time period ranging from the 1930s to the 1965s with its music, lifestyle and the garments people were wearing. The brand’s clothes are Inspired by the positive attitude towards life of that time. Detached from the conventional, Pike Brothers is creating its collection in regards to the sturdy and true style, where form strictly follows function. With the experience from outdoor activities they know the value of functional clothing. We are working with companies that work just like “back then” with vintage looms for example and with traditional craftsmanship which has been passed on for generations. The German brand feels obliged to the traditional true style.

production of authentic outdoor and workwear of the early 20th century. Authentic to us means producing garments in exactly the same way as in the original period.

Our garments are more than the sum of fabric, patterns and accessories. They have a story to tell, the story of who they are and where they come from.

We believe that in regard to quality, traditional workmanship has prevailed. Only with carefully selected materials and a great deal of attention to detail are we able to produce garments that meet our very high standards as well as being unique in appearance and superior in comfort and durability.

Kanvas by Katin usa

Kanvas By katin usa

In the late 1950s, Nancy and Walter Katin were in the business of making canvas boat covers. One day a young Corky Carroll came into the Katin’s shop complaining of the difficulty in finding a pair of swim shorts durable enough to stand up to the then-new pastime of surfboard riding.  Walter used his sewing machine and some of the sturdy boat canvas previously used for boat covers and created the first pair of Kanvas by Katin surf trunks.

The Katins kept making their surf trunks, selling them from the Surfside store and through a hemisphere-wide network of surf shop dealers. From the 1960s through the 1970s, many top surfers were loyal customers  and appeared in surf magazine ads wearing them. Walter Katin died in 1967, and Nancy continued to run the shop and the business in the same manner as before.

In 1977, just as professional surfing was starting to take off, Nancy Katin initiated an annual Pro/Am Team Challenge at the Huntington Beach Pier. With many of the world’s best surfers coming to compete, winning the Katin Team Challenge became a prestigious accomplishment in the surfing world. By the late 1970s, the surf industry had begun a decade of explosive growth, but Katin continued to run the business as before. Her health began to decline in the early 1980s, just as surf wear was gaining mass popularity, and other manufacturers began take advantage of the trend, aggressively marketing their products with slick advertising and worldwide promotional blitzes. Katin, however, continued to sew surf trunks in the back room of the Surfside store, selling them up front and through the same loyal network of surf shops.

In 1986 Nancy Katin died. The Katins had no children, and Nancy left the business to her friend and seamstress, Sato Hughes, who had begun sewing trunks for the couple in 1961. Along with her son Glenn, Sato continued to run the Katin operation in the same low-key manner. They focused on the retail store and on maintaining the quality of Katin surf trunks.

By the early 1990s, the big surf wear market had “shaken out” and hardcore surfers were again looking for a pair of functional, durable trunks. Glenn and Sato held down the retail end, while two Newport Beach surfers, Bill and Rick, who had experience in marketingsales and production, took over the wholesale side of the business. They started by updating the classic canvas designs with nylon material and adjusting the lengths and fit for a modern clientele. They added shorts, shirts, pants and jackets to the product line, and with the new samples in hand, set off on a tour of surf shops in coastal cities in the United States. They were met by an enthusiastic response from shop proprietors, who found that sales were strong

Glenn and Sato now focused their efforts on the Katin shop. They filled it with clothingwetsuitsskateboardssurfboardsbody boards and accessories, while surf shop walls were adorned with photostrophies and other memorabilia spanning decades of surfing history.

In 1998 Bill and Rick sold the wholesale side of the business to K2 Sports, and inaugurated the merger with Bill’s brainchild, the “K2 Big Wave Challenge” (later known as the “Swell XXL”, and now as the “Billabong XXL”). The K2 buyout soon led to the principals migrating to other ventures and finally the demise of the Katin wholesale business. Glenn Hughes fought to reacquire the name for many years. In 2000 Nancy Katin was inducted into the Surfing Walk of Fame in Huntington Beach as Woman of the Year. In 2005, Glenn Hughes, with partner Robert Schmidt, regained the right from K2 to once again sell wholesale under the Katin name. On July 4 of the same year, Glenn Hughes with online partner Rod Kelsey launched a new website, KatinSurf.com, replacing prior URLs Katin-Surf.com (2006) Katin.com (1998) and KanvasByKatin.com (2000).

Mens Vintage Jeans

The 1960s saw fashion reject the conventions and niceties of previous eras. Clothing broke with social traditions that dictated what could be worn when and by whom. In the past, attire had been divided in to ‘formal’ and ‘casual’ wear, and distinct separations were made between the styles of clothing worn by men and women. The 1960s, however, saw the emergence of unisex clothing such as denim jeans, which could be worn by both sexes. Denim jeans, which had remained a staple wardrobe item for many young people throughout the decade, were inspired by mod fashion. New styles of denim jeans emerged and the rest is history.

One of the top denim trends is always going to be jeans. From flared to bootcut to skinny and wide leg, jeans are coming in and out of fashion trends all of the time. Jeans are settling for a more classic fit. Almost anything goes. Skinny, straight, pooled around the ankle, even cropped. The main thing to remember with jeans, or any clothing to pull off the classic trend in men’s fashion, is that they fit you. That’s true for most things you wear to make it look classic. Jeans will remain a classic though and, if done right, very contemporary.

Discover Relco London’s range of high quality vintage men’s jeans. Designed to help you achieve that classic 60s look, Relco London have been at the forefront of Vintage UK fashion since 1964.

camplin – made in italy

The Camplin success story really came from the British Colonies, where Charles understood the need for standardization in uniform production. From that moment on he was the one to supply uniforms to the Royal Navy in their most important Colonial Campaign. This was also the reason why he was awarded the Naval General Service medal (a medal with a blue ribbon with green stripes) and to this day the same blue and green tape is used in finishing touches to the Peacoat.

This is a short length of cord used as an extension for buttoning up the double breasted jacket. The cordage was used in colder climates when the added layers of clothing under the uniform meant that the jacket couldn’t be buttoned up by using the buttonhole. Each seaman had his own cordage made to measure for his sea voyages.

Mr Camplin was well-known for supplying uniforms to the Royal Navy. It was in fact his idea to suggest the use of the Peacoat as part of the Petty Officer’s uniform. Up until then Petty Officers had the same uniform as ordinary able seamen. However they needed their own uniform to make the distinction but something that would be more practical than the Great Coat which senior Officers had. Mr Camplin than came up with the idea of a jacket, having the same important style as a coat but the practical ease in movement of a jacket. So the P. Officers got their P.Coat (P for Petty in Petty Officer) which then for phonetic reasons became the word Peacoat. This is the story behind why Mr Camplin is rightly believed by many to be the inventor of the Peacoat.

The use of an edging as a border for our buttonholes and pocket edges made of a blue grosgrain with green stripes which reminds usof the ribbon used for the General Naval Service medal givento civilians who distinguished themselves in the service ofthe Royal Navy.

Three Stroke Production

Three Stroke Productions started in 1997 in South East London: a small warehouse, three friends with the same dream and great desire to create something special.
Most of the garments since then have been made by small independent clothing firms in Italy. Firms that share the same outlook and mindset, as at TSP they believe that one of the main aspects required to succeed in this business is to be part of a trustworthy chain based on values of quality and respect!
The (sub) cultural and the combat sports background of the main men behind the label has always played a big role in Three Stroke Productions.
The roots of the early days are endorsed by a contemporary approach made from high quality fabrics and great attention to details. TSP want to keep being an independent label, strong and trustworthy with great relationships with its suppliers and retailers and true to the expectations of the people who buy our garments
TSP like to think that the garments tell a story. With some of them telling Three Stroke Productions own personal story.